training for uphill skiing

it’s that time of year when people are looking ahead towards ski season, and often i get emails and messages asking me: “what are you doing to get in shape for the ski season?” the reality is, the best way to get in shape for skiing is actually skiing. coupled with many hundreds if not thousands of days climbing and skiing, the overall gist of what i have discovered is that “training” can be and should become part of the at skiing lifestyle. by around turkey day, i am a few pounds heavier than during the summer, my endurance is not what it was in july, but my power and endurance are in key shape to take on skiing. you can make it as regimented or relaxed as you want, but the key is to do it — resistance training for a minimum of three days per week in the months before you ski. full disclosure i am fanboy of ua (uphill athlete) as their guidance has changed my fitness and general well being for the better. the general message in this article–strength training is great for endurance athletes–is absolutely true, but some of the specific prescriptions, such as going for a run before strength training, or the sprint routine, do not align with best practices for optimal training for the great majority of athletes, and are probably inefficient and perhaps detrimental to building either endurance or strength, to the best of my knowledge. if you really want to get specific there are chapters in the ua that uncover myths of training that were perpetuated by proclaimed professionals and coaches. i read a great piece on the “best” interval training only to read in the small print the test subjects were obese women in the forties! the protocol for a skimo racer is far from the perfect routine for the ski mountaineer that is going to be putting in long days for weeks at a clip. i’ts legit in general, but for a variety of reasons the protocol simply doesn’t mesh with my personal experience of going to altitude and how i have learned to thrive up high. hi mike, i know this post is about the science of training for the uphill, but once you’ve done the uphill you still have to do the downhill.




not that it’s not legit, it is, but because people are so different and even science is not perfect. the statement that a perfect science would lead to stasis is false–a perfect science would lead to a continual improvement of human knowledge and capacity. it would make more sense to do the 30 minute run at one point in the day, for example, in the morning, then recover, and then do the strength training in the afternoon. and i’m a fan of the science as you are. but yes as a basis the science is great for the do’s and more important the don’t’s. from the podcasts i have listened to with louise burke and mike nelson etc. i don’t know the medical term but it’s as if your body goes into survival mode up high and starts to metabolize fat as a power source. but when you are up against a “cult’ lchf movement, there is no winning, particularly when it comes to the pseudo-science of nutrition. the foods with somewhat higher fat/protein (like a protein bar) are often more tasty, so for that reason alone i eat more of them, and thus stay fueled and maintain my reserves. yes, it is hard to do science when the number of confounding variables is large as it is when doing studies of humans, and i entirely appreciate the challenge; but that does not give license to make unsupported statements and mis-lead those who are looking for guidance. a couple of links (one on nutrition and one on apparently corrupt research): /news/2018/08/24/john-ioannidis-aims-his-bazooka-nutrition-science-13357 , and /contents/something-doesn-t-add-up agree on the lower carb thing, but again it is likely to be very individual.

you can make it as regimented or relaxed as you want, but the key is to do it — resistance training for a minimum of three days per week in the months before you ski. the good news: skiing after a long climb with a solid resistance program makes all the difference in the world. this is the plan for expert back country skiers and ski mountaineers who seek out the steep lines on training for the uphill athlete: a manual for mountain runners and ski mountaineers [house, steve, johnston, scott,, training for the uphill athlete pdf, training for the uphill athlete pdf download, uphill athlete base training, uphill athlete base training, training for backcountry skiing.

you’ve probably been running, doing interval training to build up your endurance for the uphill slog, and maybe even interested in getting started with uphill skiing (aka ski mountaineering races and uphill skiing are the ultimate way to gain some aerobic fitness and log solid training hours at altitude. steve house and scott johnston teamed up with endurance superstar kílian jornet to create “training, training for the uphill athlete review, uphill athlete workout, training for the new alpinism, training for the uphill athlete vs training for the new alpinism

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